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with lawmakers as lyndon johnson did. >> yeah, far guy who is so smart it really does puzzle me. perhaps jod city or john can answer as to why he just doesn't appreciate the fact that personal relationships matter in politics at every level always have going back to lincoln. look at spielberg's film. 2013 always will. he doesn't do it terribly well, maybe that's why he wants to suggest it doesn't matter. i agree with everything that jodi just said about some of the opportunities. i do think it's worrisome and not just a parochial matter. it's worrisome that they aren't bringing more people in not just because diversity of voices and views helps but some of these people are tired. some of these people-- particularly economic people-- they are spent, charlie. i wish there were -- you had this sense there was an infusion of fresh ideas and fresh blood. not to change views and change him but just to kind of bring more vital toy the tail rather than just get ready for the big fight. senator chuck schumer has a theory to go to al's point that he tells his colleagues which is that because president obam
dominated the political scene. lyndon johnson grittily be very goldwater and richard nixon, overwhelming george mcgovern. each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of huge popularity. and many of our presidential elections, the candidates are in a fitted title to present themselves as the one capable of serving the country with the winner is walking off with the modern maturity. the customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate would be the better theater. is there really a difference between these two considerations? is it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on effectiveness during his first term versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenger. it's easy to point to the national security or economic consequences impact on the ratings have been i
of the "wall street journal." joe califano, once an aid to lyndon johnson. taylor branch, author of a new book on race. and james peterson of lehigh university. we'll round it out with the newest brother act in politics, san antonio mayor julian castro and his air, dentical twin, joaquin castro, just elected to congress. that's a big group but there's a lot to talk about on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> and good morning again. we welcome to the broadcast david plouffe, architect of the president's election in 2008, again last year a key adviser in the administration throughout. let me ask you first about the situation in algeria, where this awful terrorist attack took place. we know that there were seven americans at that compound, and the reports are one is dead. do you have any more information on any of the others? >> i don't this morning, bob. obviously, if and when we have additional information, the state department will release that >> and what about this whole state of terrorism now? have we defeated
instead of wanting to be magic johnson, he wants -- >> now the moan is beginning mark. charles schumer of new york, the chairman of the joint committee on inaugural ceremony. >> mr. president, mr. vice president. members of congress, all who are present, and to all who are watching, welcome to the capital and to his celebration of our great democracy. [applause] [cheering] >> this is the 57th inauguration of an american president. and no matter how many times one witnesses this event, it's simplicity, its innate majesty, and most of all, it's meaning, that sacred yet cautious entrusting of power from we the people to our chosen leader, never fails to make one's heart beat faster as it will today with the inauguration of president barack h. obama! [cheering] >> now, we know that we would not be here today where it not for those who stand guard around the world to preserve our freedom. to those in our armed forces, we offer our infinite thanks. for your bravery, your honor, your sacrifice. >> this democracy of ours was forged by intellect argument, by activism and blood. and, above all,
a previous president, lyndon b. johnson. joining us is joe who served as a special assistant to lbj and a close adviser to president kennedy as well. he is the author of the awesomely titled what the approximately hell is a presidency for? >> making washington work, a new publication and he joins us now. i am endlessly fascinated with lbj and the life story and the 39s presidency. you can read these books and see the immediate change when jfk dies and lbj assumes the office, there is this bill install and he works his magic and the phones and gets his way on that and gets his way on the tax bill that kennedy couldn't get through. my question is when you look at the great skills and the talents that lbj had dealing with the senate and congress, do they really apply in the era of hyper polarization that we live in? the republican leader. does mitch mcconnell respond with the same? >> i think you have to remember that there was terrific polarization in the 1960s. the democratic party was in control of tourn democrats who were against the kifl rights bills and controlled the mitties. th
biography of johnson. they're talking about how big to be on civil rights and one of the so-called wise men goes to johnson and basically said that's not practical. it's a worthy cause but it's a lost cause. and johnson turns around and goes, what the hell's the presidency for? i actually thought yesterday was an interesting day. it was one of the days where compare it, say, to health care. this was a big idea and the president went out there with an ambitious proposal. the question, though, in american politics now is whether he can match the intensity of the nra. what matters is not simply 60/40, 70/30 in polls. you know that. can he mobilize on a sustained basis? people who really care about this issue? >> and this is another reason why it's such a game changer because so many people have been engaged by the sandy hook massacre, whatever the nra spins, people that want sensible gun safety laws are going to spend three, four, five times as much. mika, also the argument that there's a slippery slope and if you get rid of these military-style assault weapons and the magazines, the high-capa
's package. max baucus of montana, senator heidi heitkamp of north dakota, senator johnson of south dakota. senator donnelley of i7d ind. senator begich of alaska, senator manchin of west virginia, senator tester of montana. however, senator mark warner spoke out in favor of the president's plan and said he believes it has bipartisan support. those senators all have a or a-plus ratings from the national rifle association. reid has a b rating. these senators know they will lose their high rating and maybe become a target with the nra if they vote for a sensible assault weapons ban. you see, we had the assault weapons ban back in 1994, but we're so screwed up in washington right now they're even afraid to go back to that. every senator should explain to their constituency why they would not cast a vote for the assault weapons ban. what's the holdup? what are you afraid of? certainly it's not the nra. these senators should not fear the national rifle association. the nra didn't affect any races in the last election cycle and it probably won't do it the next time around. now, if senate democra
'm carolyn johnson. >> it's good stuff. it's already being called har-bowl. brothers jim and john harbaugh coaching their way into the championship game in new orleans. the 49ers jim harbaugh and his brother, john, haven't spoken to each other about the match up yet. they probably won't, either. we have live coverage for you tonight beginning with abc 7 news larry beil. they're making history here this, is good stuff. >> no talking about it. >> right. >> this is such an unusual situation because it's never happened where before. we've seen the manning brother, peyton and eli playing but never against each other. so brother versus brother is the story here, fans want to explore every little aspect of the har-bowl, two people are tired of this whole thing, jim and john, themselves. they've been brothers so they're used to it. both expressed the same feeling in their minds this is all old news. >> every moment you're talking about myself or john, that is less, less time that the players are going to be talked about. >> fighters are fers, ones playing in the game. you know? they've had the mos
. and finally, when he supports social security, medicaid and medicare, that's straight lyndon johnson, great society talk. this is a speech in the progressive tradition. at some points it's like the second inaugural of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that'
this after 380 filibusters compared to when lyndon johnson was the senate majority leader where he had one filibuster? >> well, this is the point, right? we have a senate that's frozen, broken, doesn't work. pick your favorite adjective or vertebrae. it's not working. this is not what democracy looks like. it's only on the first day and technically we're still in the first day of the congress, two-year period that this can be done by 51 senators, meaning in this case there's 55 in the democratic caucus and we'll take 51 of them. we need all of those 51 to stand up to have a senate that actually discusses the issues of the day. and allows the president's nominations to reach the floor and allows conference committees to actually meet. so when the house and senate pass two different bills there's a way to reconcile that. none of that is happening. >> harry reid said that he has been negotiating with senate minority leader mitch mcconnell to avoid having the so-called nuclear option. i would go so far as to say does mitch mcconnell even deserve to be in the position to negotiate what the sena
nixon and remember what happened to him. iran-contra for president reagan. >> and lyndon johnson and vietnam war. >> right. >> one of the things we know absolutely for sure is that something is going to go wrong in the second term. >> it always happens. >> always. sometimes you can foresee it, natural disaster, a terrorist attack. it could be who know what is? i think that we're pretty safe in deciding that there's not a sex scandal in the obama family. >> george bush, it was the financial crisis. >> right. >> and katrina. >> and iraq. >> the idea's how they handle it. >> i'm going to go out on a limb. i think the worst may be behind him. he's actually got more momentum going in than most presidents do. his numbers are actually going up. the economy's getting a little bit better. the wars are winding down so he does have a shot but most important thing to say is i think he's found his game. >> if you look at president's popularity, his is low. >> one of the lowest in past 20, 30 years but the numbers moving in the right direction. i think he's found his rhythm, found a way to act
. >> and let's not forget, lyndon johnson and the vietnam war. one of the things we know absolutely for sure, is that something is going to go wrong in the second term. it always does. always. sometimes you can foresee it as it's coming, could be a natural disaster, a terrorist attack, it could be -- who knows what, i think that we're pretty safe in deciding that there's not going to be a sex scandal in the obama family. >> george bush it was the financial crisis. >> exactly. >> but i -- >> katrina. >> and iraq. >> the idea is how they handle it, how they handle it. >> i'm going to go out on a limb. i think the worst may be behind him. he's actually got more momentum going in than most presidents do, his numbers are actually going up. the k34e's getting a little bit better, the wars are winding down, he does have a shot. i think the most important thing i would say is, i think he's found his game. >> you look at his popularity as compared to other presidents, it's relatively low. >> it is. one of the lowest in the past 20, 30 years, the numbers are moving in the right direction. i think he's
regulation -- until it happened. consider the civil rights act of 1964. it took johnson's legislative genius to overcome what seemed to be an unshakeable logjam. in our lifetimes we have served enough non-trivial change to impaire that the iron grip of these forces can be shattered and policy can progress. and the debate over the regulation of guns and the balance of civil obligation will command sustained attention from our political leadership, as lobbyists apply their cases. in this unruly mix, universities like ours will discharge a critical role in principled scaffolding for the debate. our scholars have investigated gun violence for the last two decades. we have produced national recognized research to curtail gun violence. we have accumulated a wealth of knowledge and we hope much of it will come to the floor the next few days. we have convened scholars and advocates and want to sue this opportunity to cut through the din of the shrill and incendiary by identifying specific recommendations that evidence- based analysis will work and can be rendered congruent with our legal institution
tim johnson, democrat of south dakota, "it makes common sense to not have one size fits all. senator mark begich, democrat of alaska, "i feel like it's going to be hard for they of these pieces of legislation to pass at this point." these are democrats. what is he going to bring to bear on that? >> it is a tough issue. i will say this, these are commonsense proposals that respect the rights of gun owners. let's start there. and i think if you look at high-capacity magazines, assault weapons, universal background checks, the progress we can make on mental health and school safety, all of these enjoy enormous support of the american people. democrats and republicans, so i think that putting together the legislative coalition is going to be hard obviously but we're very confident. i do think things have changed since newtown, you know, senator manchin and republicans and democrats are thinking anew about this issue. >> but senator harry reid, the democratic leader in the senate, and those senators i just mentioned all signaling that the assault weapons ban is not likely to get through a
term. iran contra, it often does not work out. >> and let's not forget, lyndon johnson and the vietnam war. one of the things we know absolutely for sure, is that something is going to go wrong in the second term. it always does. always. sometimes you can foresee it as it's coming, could be a natural disaster, a terrorist attack, it could be -- who knows what, i think that we're pretty safe in deciding that there's not going to be a sex scandal in the obama family. >> george bush it was the financial crisis. >> exactly. >> but i -- >> katrina. >> and iraq. >> the idea is how they handle it, how they handle it. >> i'm going to go out on a limb. i think the worst may be behind him. he's actually got more momentum going in than most presidents do, his numbers are actually going up. the k34e's getting a little bit better, the wars are winding down, he does have a shot. i think the most important thing i would say is, i think he's found his game. >> you look at his popularity as compared to other presidents, it's relatively low. >> it is. one of the lowest in the past 20, 30 years, the numb
the civil rights act of 1964. it took lyndon johnson to probably send it forward. he overcame what seems to be an unshakable logjam. in short, in our lifetimes, we have served enough nontrivial policy changes to recognize the inherent iron grip of status quo forces can be shattered and policy can progress. in the next few weeks, we can anticipate and hope that the debate over the regulation of guns and the balance between individual rights and civic obligation will command sustained into serious attention from our political leadership. advocates will mobilize as lobbyists plied their cases. in this unruly mix, universities like ours can and will discharge a critical role in providing principled scaffolding for this debate. here at johns hopkins, our scholars have been investigating the public health effects of gun violence for well over two decades. for the past 17 years, the center for gun aussie and research, envisaged by our colleague, has provided a home for that study areas producing nationally recognized research and recommendations aimed at understanding and curtailing the impact
] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. visit your eyecare professional today to ask about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you. >>> you know you're not supposed to do it, but taking your eyes off the road, even for a moment, can have a devastate impact. >> and cnn's sandra endo is here. you actually climbed into a simulator to sort of illustrate all of this. >> yeah. and it was very surprising, joe and kate, just what could happen, if you take your eyes off the road, just for a few seconds. really, it just shows, also, how deadly cell phones could be or any type of distraction inside your car. and it happened to me in a simulator. but we also spoke with one woman who shared with us her tragedy real-life story. if this picture doesn't say
that money we turned around and spent eight because johnson created the unified budget so we no longer have that fire will. and so all of a sudden now the 02.6 trillion to social security that we are going to have to borrow as social security on linus which is about 2030, the regular social security problem. >> host: matthew posts senator coburn, three questions. one, the social security and other social entrance programs like medicare and medicaid infringe on personal responsibility? number two, cbo reports federal health spending will dominate mandatory spending by the mid 20s 30's. >> host: there's been a lot of psychological and social research on this. if you think somebody else will take care of you, and it's your government saying you will, then you are less likely to plan or prepare for that. and cbo is right my generation will hit 65 in march and there's 3.5 million of us this next year that become eligible for medicare and the next year 3.5 million become eligible for social security. because that was in the tip o'neill and ronald reagan six. that's why the demographics are so imp
the second lowest number of murders, 85, since lyndon johnson was president. so we have control around our crime issues. but the number of bullets that are fired from a magazine is something that we want to see stopped. nobody needs more than ten bullets. gun violence, background checks, is something we need to see in cities. so these common sense reforms, you now have more than 750 mayors that are standing behind the president and the vice president. and we think we're going to get a bill. it's going to be hard, it's going to be thank you. but i think we're finally going to get major gun violence reform. >> let's talk about one topic real quick where we know there is not so much partisan politics. very important question, mayor. will the atlanta falcons go to the super bowl? >> oh, no question. we're one game away, kate. we're going. >> all right. >> the objective political analysis from the atlanta mayor there. >> mayor, great to see you. >> thank you, kate. >> thank you so much. >> rooting for the hometown. cnn. >> for the first time, the presidential -- >> atlanta falcons, best in the
't they do like johnson did. they built fences around every wrecking yard and scrap yard and junkyard in america on the highways. they build all these fences around every school where nobody can see in, and if they put somebody there at the gates like they did in the airports and things like that. host: the nra bought it up. guest: they were highly criticized for that press conference a few weeks ago. again, a difference in opinion on how we should go about making schools safer. from the democratic perspective, the fewer guns, the less likely that there will be violent and dangers in our schools. from the gun control opponents, people who do not want to see restrictions, they should be about keeping the schools safer from a person who is mentally unbalanced, marching in with their weapons. and there is controversy about that. you heard obama speak about this a couple weeks ago when he laid out his initiative, and he talked about providing resources officers to school and access occurred 84 schools that wanted it. he did not want to force it. you do not want to turn a school fortress.r
personally have delivered around 5,000 babies. in the 31 years i was in medical practice in johnson city, tennessee, a small town in northeast tennessee, our group had delivered over 25,000 babies. 25,000 children. i see these children now as doctors and lawyers and teachers and sunday school teachers and soccer coaches and housewives, farmers, you name it. bettering our community. i cannot imagine my community without these young people there. they are the future of this great nation. and i've seen this, as dr. harris mentioned, i saw when ultrasound went from when it was just a blob you saw to being able to visionize a heart beat 28 days or less postconception. it's unbelievable to be able to see that and to see this child develop is something that i can't explain to you how fulfilling that is, to be able to see that happen and to have a choice. that is a law we have to get right in this country. and thank goodness minds are changing. . i look around this great room, this great chamber and wonder if choices would be different and members of congress might not be here if a different cho
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)

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